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Posts tagged “Health”

A couple of weeks ago we looked at “Low fat high carb” diets. How much confusion there still seems to be about them AND how this has unwittingly contributed to rising levels of Diabetes and Obesity. However, with the huge number of different diets out there being marketed as “the one” – particularly at this time of year (!) – it’s not surprising that many people are still completely confused about the different options; let alone which is the best one for them. 
 
So, this week, we’re going to have a look at the two most popular types of diets in the last couple of years. Low Carb and Intermittent Fasting. But, don’t be fooled. They both appear in many different guises, each with their own particular programme and celebrity endorsement (!). 
Last April – goodness it doesn’t seem that long ago (!) – we wrote about the worrying increase in those being diagnosed with Diabetes Type II Diabetes, also known as “Non Insulin Dependent Diabetes”. Even worse, it’s now being diagnosed in much younger people – those still in their teens and early 20’s – rather than people of middle age, who also tended to be overweight and sedentary. If you missed this post you can find it here
 
Sadly, yet again, it’s become clear that this trend is being fuelled by poor lifestyle choices. In other words, poor diet and increasingly sedentary lifestyles. Not surprisingly, both of these are also linked to Obesity, a well known risk factor for Diabetes, as well as many other conditions. 
 
This has led to the modern dietary advice of eating a “Low Fat, High Carb” diet being put under the spotlight. Suddenly it doesn’t seem to be such a healthy option, leaving many confused and unsure about exactly what they should be eating. And, just as importantly, what they should be avoiding. 
 
So, this week, we’re going to have a look at what most people understand as a “Low Fat, High Carb” diet and why it isn’t quite what they think it is. 
It’s interesting how the mention of certain words is guaranteed to cause panic, particularly those of a medical bent. There are so many we could mention (!) but let’s just focus on the one we’d like to talk about today, fevers. 
 
Turn back the clock a few decades and fevers weren’t viewed in the same way as they are today. They were seen as part and parcel of many illnesses, particularly the childhood – often spotty – ones. Chicken Pox, Mumps, Measles and the like. 
 
Come back to today and the prevailing view is that they are “bad”, to be avoided at all costs. And, if you’re unlucky enough to have one, brought down as quickly as possible. 
 
But is it really that simple? Let’s find out. 
Over the years, we’ve heard this numerous times from clients and our reply is always the same. Thank goodness you have or you wouldn’t be talking to us! And, yes, we know this is probably not the answer they were expecting, but it always prompts a smile and helps puts things into perspective… 
 
Blood pressure – and by that we mean high blood pressure (!) – is becoming an increasing problem worldwide, not just in the West. It’s estimated that 1 in 4 adults in the UK have high blood pressure, Hypertension if you want to be more technical. So, this week, let’s find out about high blood pressure and why it’s such a concern. 
Not surprisingly, the subject of Christmas – AHHHH!!! – has been coming up with clients over the last few weeks and we thought it was about time to suggest an alternative less stressful approach. And, while we’re focussing on the 25th December, it applies equally to any family gathering ... 
 
Even though you probably don’t want to be reminded of it (!) let’s start with a quick reminder of the traditional recipe for Christmas: 
Over the last few winters, there’s been a marked increase in the number of chest infections, particularly Bronchitis and Pneumonia. While many different causes have been suggested for this – colder, damp winters and changes in the bugs doing the rounds being the most common – as yet there’s no definitive answer. 
 
Like many conditions with similar symptoms – such as Sprains and Strains, Dementia and Alzheimer’s – they’re easy to confuse. However, if you know what to look for, they are quite different. So, this week, let’s take a closer look at them. 
We often talk about the importance of spending time outside every day. Not only does it feel good to have a break away from the hurly burly of modern life, but natural daylight plays an important part in helping set our natural body rhythms. Often referred to as the circadian rhythms, they control many different body functions including the sleep – wake cycle, release of hormones, body temperature, eating habits and digestion. 
 
Before we go any further, let’s quickly dispel one very common misconception. So far as your body’s concerned, it doesn’t matter whether it’s a beautiful sunny day or a wet overcast one. It’s being outside in natural wavelength light that’s the important thing. You’ll still reap the benefits regardless of what the weather’s doing. 
 
It’s a myth of modern medicine that there’s a definitive test / investigation / scan to allow every disease / condition / syndrome to be conclusively diagnosed. And, once this has occurred, a treatment protocol is ready and waiting to address the issue. 
 
Sadly, this isn’t the case, with many patients failing to get a definitive diagnosis for their particular set of symptoms. Spending years in limbo trying to make sense of what’s happening to them. 
It’s no secret that regular exercise has a myriad of health benefits, both mental and physical. 
 
Sadly, it’s equally true that exercise is a dirty word for many people. Often this can be traced back to those dreaded games lessons at school which put them off exercise for life. And, as someone who was always last to be picked for any teams – not to mention a fully paid up member of the “two left feet” club (!) – Elaine knows all about this first hand… 
 
What’s so sad, is that there are many different forms of exercise – particularly these days – which are light years away from those inflicted at school. And, even better, many of them don’t really feel like exercise at all. Just something that’s fun to do. 
Having answered the question of why joints “pop” a few of weeks ago, we weren’t expecting to be answering another one of those questions so soon. It must be something to do with schools going back; as we’ve been asked lots of similar questions recently, only some of which will feature in future blog posts… 
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