01787 278750 
07785 777014 
Find out our latest news and blog posts about Smart Holistics here 

Posts tagged “Vitamins”

In recent years the consumption of vegetable oils has increased dramatically while that of butter, lard and other animal products have shown a marked decline. As so often is the case, no single factor is responsible for this change, although the popularity of the Mediterranean Diet in the 1960’s and 1970’s probably helped kickstart this trend. 
 
The logic behind the diet was simple, trying to emulate the health benefits from the diet of those living in and around the Mediterranean. In other words, a wholefood and locally sourced diet centring around fresh produce. Fresh vegetables, salad, fruit, nuts, beans and grains with smaller amounts of protein, predominately fish, along with unsaturated fats, such as Olive Oil. And it’s these last two foods which are key to what we’re talking about today, as you’ll see in a moment. Fish and Olive Oil. Other meat and dairy products were only occasionally eaten. Oh, and don’t forget plenty of red wine (!). 
Traditionally, Osteoporosis was thought of as a “woman’s disease”, affecting ladies of a certain age (!), with little that could be done about it. Whether proactively or reactively. Not an encouraging picture and one which is now proving far from true on both counts. 
 
Sadly, Osteoporosis is now affecting many more people. Not only younger women, but children and men too. At the same time, research has found that it’s not simply a hormonal issue but, once again, lifestyle factors play a large part. 
Having had similar conversations with a number of Clients recently – which is always a gentle hint that it’ll make a good topic for a blog post (!) – it seemed like a good time to share our rather different perspective on illness. One most people have never considered. And that is the amount of energy it takes to be ill. 
 
Confused? Then read on, it’ll all make sense in a minute. Yes, it will! 
 
If you’ve been unlucky enough to have Flu – or something similar (!) – the one thing you’re likely to remember above all others, was how exhausted you felt. As one Client so eloquently put it, if someone had offered him a £50 note to get out of bed and go downstairs, he wouldn’t have been able to do it. 
 
Why is that? 
There are some things which never seem to change. The schools go back and, right on cue, Summer finally arrives. Or, at least, an Indian Summer. Which, after the very traditional English Summer we’ve “enjoyed” this year, seems even more poignant than usual. Then, quick on their heels, come a spate of calls and emails from Clients looking ahead to the colder months of the year. 
 
Each year, our advice is basically the same. To focus on the small things you do every day; the majority of which, dare we say, are down to good old fashioned common sense. These help support both your long term health AND that over the coming Winter. Then, having got the basics right, add any necessary top ups. Supplements, tinctures and the like. 
Go into any shop selling food – or, more often, food like products rather than real food (!) – and you’re virtually guaranteed to go past a shelf of energy drinks on your way to the till. Or, all too often, conveniently placed within easy reach along with other sugary snacks as you wait for your turn to pay. 
 
Marketed as a quick and easy way to boost energy levels, sales have rocketed in the last few years, with no end in sight. Along with a take away coffee and sugary snack, they’re used by many people to kick start their day instead of breakfast. Or, in the evening, with alcohol to keep going late into the night. And, while we’ve all seen the short term effects of both approaches – although, hopefully, not directly from personal experience (!) – very little thought seems to be given to the long term consequences… 
A couple of weeks ago we waxed lyrical about the joys – and simplicity – of eating with the seasons. Even better, how easy it is to grow things at home, to enjoy straight from your garden or kitchen windowsill. Yes really! If you missed it, click here
 
While people tend to think about all things salad, particularly at this time of year, herbs are just as easy to grow. Even better, you’ll often find pots of them at your local supermarket, if you don’t want to wait (!) or grow your own from seed. Not only do they taste great – and are nothing like their dried counterparts – but have a host of health benefits too. 
 
So, this week, we’re going to take a quick look at three herbs which are used in most kitchens – at some time at least – and are easy to grow. Parsley. Mint. Basil. 
With the recent bout of warm weather, we were very tempted to write about one of our pet subjects this week. And there are no prizes for guessing what it is. Water and the importance of keeping properly hydrated all year round (!). Not just when the weather is hot, although it’s much easier to take the hint at this time of year… 
 
To us it’s very obvious but, from the calls we get from Clients, it seems the message still isn’t getting through. If you need a quick reminder about the importance of water, as well as the signs you may be dehydrated, click here
 
Following on from this is a very common sign of dehydration which also features regularly in calls from Clients at this time of year. Cramp, particularly those excruciating leg cramps which always seem to come on in the middle of the night. Again, if you need a quick reminder, click here
 
Which neatly brings us on to what we’d like to talk about today. True, it’s another of our pet subjects but, as always, there is method in our madness. Yes, really! 
We often talk about the joys of seasonal eating. Enjoying whatever foods are in season right now, however short their season may be. Not only does it mean we’re eating foods when they’re at their natural best – both in terms of flavour and nutrients – but it’s an easy way to eat local, avoiding the dreaded food miles. 
 
We’ve all learnt about this the hard way. Succumbing to those perfect looking out of season fruit and vegetables found in the supermarkets during the Winter, flown in from the other side of the world for our delectation. And then bitterly disappointed to find they’re nothing like those grown locally and enjoyed at their natural time of year… Strawberries are a prime example of this which, sadly, most of us have fallen for at some time or other… 
How things change. A few years ago, Vitamin D was only mentioned in connection with helping maintain healthy bones. Although, as an aside, this is still the case on NHS Direct when we googled it a few days ago… 
 
Moving swiftly on (!), the good news is that the message is finally getting out that Vitamin D does so much more than help support healthy bones. In fact, it’s increasingly becoming clear that it’s just as important as Vitamin C in supporting the Immune System. And much more besides. There’s also been some interesting recent research in connection with the current madness – as well as to winter bugs in general – showing just how important it is. Not only in helping reduce susceptibility, but also in improving the outcome, should the worst happen. More about this later. 
Having waxed lyrical about the joys of apples and pears a couple of weeks ago, this week we’re going to look at some of the veg which are at their best right now. And for the next few months too. True, they’re not as exotic as some of the other produce you can find at your local supermarket, but they provide just the right mix of nutrients needed during the colder months of the year. 
 
So, without further ado, let’s start with one group of veg that doesn’t have the best PR. They’re seen as rather dull and boring, not helped by the traditional tendency of overcooking them. Well, let’s be honest, boiling them for hours until they resemble a grey green sludge in the bottom of the saucepan. In fact there used to be a standing joke that one of them should be put on to boil in November to be ready for a certain day in December… 
 
Have you guessed what we’re talking about yet? 
Our site uses cookies. For more information, see our cookie policy. Accept cookies and close
Reject cookies Manage settings