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While the age for leaving school – or college – may have increased over the years, from 14 a few decades ago to 18 in more recent years, the sentiment expressed by many on reaching this milestone has not. 
 
And, with testing now starting early on in Primary School, it’s completely understandable that many teenagers have simply had enough of formal education by the time they reach 18. Vowing to NEVER EVER take another exam again. 
 
While some do manage to avoid any further formal education – and the dreaded exams – is it really true that you’ll never need to learn anything else again? 
Not surprisingly there are some questions that regularly come up – and we’d be very rich by now if we had a pound every time they did (!). The one we’d like to focus on today is one of the most popular, although that doesn’t make it an easy one to answer. 
 
Bitter experience shows us that, if we go into too much detail, people’s eyes tend to glaze over as they go into mental meltdown. Making it too simple isn’t any better, as people tend to end up completely confused… 
 
Having – unintentionally – caused mental overload to various people over the years (!), we’ve found that an analogy is the simplest way to explain how the two approaches differ. And having experimented with various different ones over the years (!) we’ve found that the one which works best uses the example of how you look after your house. 
 
So, if you're sitting comfortably, then here we go. 
 
It’s been a while since we’ve written about the all too human tendency to make snap judgements on whatever happens in our lives. “This is good, that is bad.” “She is nice, he is horrible.” Not forgetting the perennially favourite one: “How can she – or he (!) – go out looking like that.” And, if you think you’re above all those petty judgments, think again… 
 
On one hand, there’s no doubt that being able to make a snap judgement is a potential life saver in an emergency situation. However, ironically, in those situations it’s not our conscious mind that calls the shots. It’s just too slow and too limited. 
 
Instead, our subconscious mind takes over, aided by a burst of adrenaline hitting our system. Before we’ve consciously realised what’s happening our subconscious mind has assessed the situation, considered the options, made a judgement and started taking the necessary action. What’s particularly interesting is that often, with the power of hindsight, the action taken falls outside our experience – and makes no logical sense – but was just the right thing to do. 
Over the years, we’ve seen many different clients with many different injuries – and, as you can imagine, heard some very interesting stories as to how whatever it was happened. There’s often the temptation to ask whether, whatever they were doing at the time really was a good idea (!), but it’s one we try not to succumb to. And before we digress any further – or break any confidences – we’d better stop there… 
 
However good the story, the symptoms of Sprains and Strains are very similar. Muscle tenderness, swelling, pain and restricted movement. So, it’s not surprising that they’re easily confused even though there are differences, if you know what to look for. However, the good news is that they can both be easily treated at home with the RICE protocol and a little common sense, more about this in a moment. 
With Valentine’s Day having just passed – all too soon after the pressures of the festive season (!) – it’s not surprising that many relationships start the new year under some strain. Sadly, along with the annual fortnight in the sun, more relationships break down after Christmas and Valentine’s Day than at any other time of year. 
 
Having talked to many more clients than we would like to about this over the years, it’s rarely a single catastrophic incident that sounds the death knell for any relationship. Usually it’s something much smaller which often appears insignificant to outsiders. The straw that broke the camel’s back. 
 
Despite this, many clients still talk about how they wished things were different. How they would like to turn the clock back to how things used to be even though, at that time, they couldn’t see how this would ever be possible. 
A couple of weeks ago we looked at “Low fat high carb” diets. How much confusion there still seems to be about them AND how this has unwittingly contributed to rising levels of Diabetes and Obesity. However, with the huge number of different diets out there being marketed as “the one” – particularly at this time of year (!) – it’s not surprising that many people are still completely confused about the different options; let alone which is the best one for them. 
 
So, this week, we’re going to have a look at the two most popular types of diets in the last couple of years. Low Carb and Intermittent Fasting. But, don’t be fooled. They both appear in many different guises, each with their own particular programme and celebrity endorsement (!). 
We often talk about the joys of serendipity and how life has a way of – almost (!) – magically falling into place IF we allow it to. Letting it unfold in its own way AND at its own pace. Often this happens in ways we never could have anticipated or takes us off in a completely new direction that turns out to be exactly what we wanted. 
 
If you’re not sure what we’re talking about – or it just sounds too good to be true – here’s a great definition of serendipity: 
 
“The occurrence and development of events by chance in a happy or beneficial way.” 
 
And, for those who love trivia, did you know that it was coined by Horace Walpole in 1754? His inspiration came from “The Three Princes of Serendip”, a fairy tale where the heroes “were always making discoveries, by accident and sagacity, of things they were not in quest of.” 
Last April – goodness it doesn’t seem that long ago (!) – we wrote about the worrying increase in those being diagnosed with Diabetes Type II Diabetes, also known as “Non Insulin Dependent Diabetes”. Even worse, it’s now being diagnosed in much younger people – those still in their teens and early 20’s – rather than people of middle age, who also tended to be overweight and sedentary. If you missed this post you can find it here
 
Sadly, yet again, it’s become clear that this trend is being fuelled by poor lifestyle choices. In other words, poor diet and increasingly sedentary lifestyles. Not surprisingly, both of these are also linked to Obesity, a well known risk factor for Diabetes, as well as many other conditions. 
 
This has led to the modern dietary advice of eating a “Low Fat, High Carb” diet being put under the spotlight. Suddenly it doesn’t seem to be such a healthy option, leaving many confused and unsure about exactly what they should be eating. And, just as importantly, what they should be avoiding. 
 
So, this week, we’re going to have a look at what most people understand as a “Low Fat, High Carb” diet and why it isn’t quite what they think it is. 
We all have things that push our buttons – or get our goat, if you were wondering why on earth we chose this week’s picture (!). And there’s a lovely word to describe them which we only came across recently, tolerations. They drain our energy and are guaranteed to ruin our day. Or sometimes our week… 
 
Some are very small in the overall scheme of things. The bill that needs paying. Vase of flowers that have seen better days. Phone call to be made. Light bulb changed. Those good intentions that we mean to do but don’t quite get round to and annoy us until we do. 
 
Others are much bigger. The annoying neighbour. Overfilled diary. Upcoming family event (!). Money worries. An annoying friend / family member / boss / fill in the blank. We all have things that come into this category – and tolerate – as we just don’t know how to deal with them. 
It’s interesting how the mention of certain words is guaranteed to cause panic, particularly those of a medical bent. There are so many we could mention (!) but let’s just focus on the one we’d like to talk about today, fevers. 
 
Turn back the clock a few decades and fevers weren’t viewed in the same way as they are today. They were seen as part and parcel of many illnesses, particularly the childhood – often spotty – ones. Chicken Pox, Mumps, Measles and the like. 
 
Come back to today and the prevailing view is that they are “bad”, to be avoided at all costs. And, if you’re unlucky enough to have one, brought down as quickly as possible. 
 
But is it really that simple? Let’s find out. 
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